TMJ 'dysfunction' - Health implications

This forum provides information relating to the role that a 'dysfunctional' jaw, dental arch anomalies and other consequential body asymmetries play in causing illness from a completely different perspective. It is meant to be your ONE stop to find out how to go about getting proper relief.
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PostPosted: Thu, 31 Mar 2022, 11:24 pm 
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"Compression of the internal jugular vein by the transverse process of the atlas was noted by researchers conducting microsurgical anatomy of 36 internal jugular veins in the upper cervical region in adult cadaveric specimens with special attention to the relationship of the vein to the atlas.

They discovered that in every specimen, the posterior wall of the internal jugular vein rested against the transverse process of the atlas as the vein descended immediately below the jugular foramen. In 14 of 36 specimens, the transverse process indented the posterior wall of the vein, causing the vein to be slightly or moderately angulated as it descended across the anterior surface of the transverse process. Three veins were severely kinked as they descended across the transverse process of the atlas." Please read this article Compression of the internal jugular vein by the transverse process of the atlas as the cause of cerebellar hemorrhage after supratentorial craniotomy

Obstruction of the Internal Jugular vein by an asymmetric Atlas is a common phenomenon. In one study in Switzerland it is claimed that 97% of the population may have this asymmetry. Our findings found a lesser incidence but appears to confirm this observation. The chance of adverse effects on the Internal Jugular vein must be considerable.

We know that the asymmetric Atlas has a direct relationship to the asymmetry of the jaws namely a midline discrepancy. The Atlas balances with what is wrong in the front of the mouth. This asymmetry causes the muscles around the neck to constantly fire to correct the dental anomaly. The muscles fail to correct the alignment because the structure causing it - the jaw and the teeth are rigid and in need of realignment.

The muscles around the neck especially the scalenes also become very stiff and often hypertrophied because of constant contraction due to impulses generated to balance the asymmetric Atlas and the asymmetric jaws. Any number of these muscles can put pressure on the IJV's further complicating the obstruction from the asymmetric Atlas vertebra. They will tend to further restrict blood outflow from the cranium.

Such an obstruction slows perfusion/transition across the brain leading to poorer oxygenation. Hypo-perfusion, or slowed blood flow, remains a constant finding in people with multiple sclerosis. The lack of freshly oxygenated blood perhaps leads to other cognitive problems and symptoms like brain fog, lethargy, poor memory, iron accumulation, cell death followed by an immune system response.

MS patients are often diagnosed with obstructions or stenosis of their IJV's. Using balloon angioplasty this is often corrected leading to a dramatic improvement of symptoms in some patients. Please read this article Compression of the internal jugular vein by the transverse process of the atlas as the cause of cerebellar hemorrhage after supratentorial craniotomy

The build-up of veinous back pressure also leads to a rise in CSF pressure leading to an increased size of the ventricles and extravasation of CSF into the brain stroma.

Tinnitus and humming in the ear is also a common occurrence due to veinous obstruction but here the TMJ also plays a major part.

In my opinion, it is extremely important to correct the jaw asymmetry and indirectly the Atlas asymmetry to prevent IJV stenosis or blockage. This would also improve arterial perfusion of the brain.

Dr Zamboni's CCSVI procedure using balloon angioplasty can than be of major help in 'MS' patients.

Failures in Dr Zamboni's CCSVI procedure could be attributable to the fact that it does not include the correction of the jaws and indirectly the Atlas vertebrae.

Please also read this article which extensively explains the anomalies of the vertebral artery due to the transverse processes of the Atlas vertebrae: Pathophysiology and Diagnosis of Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency: A Review of the Literature
Revised January 2021
©2014 -2022 M. Amir. All rights reserved.


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